You don’t need an advanced degree to know that we can benefit from practicing gratitude.  As a teacher, you are in a unique and powerful position to help your students consider, think about, and practice gratitude.

Ways to help your students practice gratitude.The benefits of developing gratitude (for all of us):

  • improved relationships
  • better health
  • better sleep
  • less stress
  • improve empathy & reduce aggression

How to help students practice gratitude:

The good news is that encouraging students to develop a practice of gratitude doesn’t take a tremendous amount of time.  Here are some ideas:

  1. be a role model — illustrate gratitude through your own actions.  Thank students and initiate conversations of gratitude.  Share what you are grateful for.
  2. an extension of that is how you interact with your colleges.  Be sure to thank other teachers and staff members as well.
  3. encourage students to thank one another — for holding the door, sharing supplies, etc.  Of course, we want that “Thank you” to be sincere.  What a good opportunity to talk about tone!
  4. take a few minutes at the start of class for students to share something they are grateful for
  5. use a daily journal for students to record three things they are grateful for.
  6. encourage your students to expand their gratitude.  They usually start with the obvious, but by encouraging students to write and reflect over an extended period of time, they will dig deeper.  “I’m grateful for food”  can turn into “I’m grateful to those who work in the fields to grow and harvest the food I eat.”
  7. students who continue to write just a simple, “I’m grateful for food” will benefit from a follow up question.  After students have had time to write their gratitude statements, ask them to write a one-sentence response to the question “Why?”
  8. challenge students to define the abstract quality of gratitude.  This can be extended into a creative writing exercise.
  9. provide students with a gratitude quote of the day to record and reflect upon in their journals
  10. consider having a “I’m Thankful for…” poster or piece of butcher paper that students can write on.  This helps students see examples of what others are thankful for and helps them expand their own thoughts.
  11. write thank you notes — students can design cards and practice thanking others by way of a note.  Perhaps you’d like your students to thank a school custodian, secretary, cafeteria worker, or another teacher.
  12. share stories of those who have been transformed by gratitude.  You may want to share John Kralik’s inspirational book 365 Thank Yous:  The Year a Simple Act of  Daily Gratitude Changed My Life.
  13. share the challenge.  Let parents and colleagues know what you’re doing in the classroom.  Suggest that this is something that families and other teachers can apply.
  14. participate in these activities with your students.  Sit down with your students and keep your own gratitude journal.
  15. Don’t stop!  Continue challenging your students to develop gratitude — like adults, sometimes just a reminder to find something to be grateful for helps improve our point of view and attitude.

Reasons I love this:

  • everyone wins!
  • great life-lesson that will have far-reaching benefits
  • perfect school/home connection
  • works as an all-school activity, all-staff activity, or just an all-classroom activity
  • we all benefit from practicing gratitude!

Looking for more?

Want a ready-to-go gratitude journal for your students?  I have print and digital resources you can download and use immediately.

gratitude journal

digital gratitude journal

inspirational slides

Here are some beautiful inspirational slides you can project on your white board.  You can use these for a daily or weekly writing prompt or simply a reminder or thoughtful quote of the day.

So, what do you think?  How can you help your students practice gratitude?  Share your thoughts in the comments below.

With gratitude 😉

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2 comments on “Ways to Teach Gratitude in the Classroom”

  1. Good evening Mrs. MaryPat,
    I love the idea of the kids and myself being more aware and learn about being grateful. I will try to use some of your suggestions in my Spanish class.
    Thank you,
    Anamaria Cuadra

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